My daily readings 12/13/2010

  • tags: ChromeOS

    • Panels

      As Jason hit on quite a bit in his post, one of the most interesting things about Chrome OS will be how developers support it. Right now, most Chrome Web Store apps are little more than mildly glorified extensions, or just links to web apps already in existence. Meanwhile, one of the coolest features of Chrome OS, panels, are barely used. Developers can and should change this quickly.

    • As Jason hit on quite a bit in his post, one of the most interesting things about Chrome OS will be how developers support it. Right now, most Chrome Web Store apps are little more than mildly glorified extensions, or just links to web apps already in existence. Meanwhile, one of the coolest features of Chrome OS, panels, are barely used. Developers can and should change this quickly.
    • The biggest factor holding up Chrome OS is mostly out of Google’s control: WiFi infrastructure. While WiFi is fairly widespread, it’s far from everywhere. And Chrome OS is worthless without connectivity. I mean, it’s completely and utterly useless.

      That’s exactly why Google teamed up with Verizon to offer back-up 3G connectivity. But beyond the paltry 100 MB they give you for free each month, that type of connection can get expensive quickly just to be able to simply use your computer.

    • And Google keeps reiterating that they intend Chrome OS to work on other platforms as well. You can imagine desktop machines running Chrome OS might be perfect for schools and libraries. And Google could of course bundle Google Apps with them. Hell, I could even see them subsidizing Chrome notebook costs to get them available to all students in certain school districts that commit to Google Apps.
    • We’re the savior for small businesses.  For consumers,

      we want to reverse this trend of spending more and more time on the

      computer and help people rediscover their cities.

      And as far as the company goes, I think we want to build a company

      that, as we get bigger, we stay honest to the brand and the corporate

      culture that made us a cool place to work and made people like us when we

      were small, and hopefully create some examples of how you don’t have to be

      like every other company even when you’re a big one.

    • I don’t know.  Maybe one deal an hour would work too.

      But the reason that we’ve stuck with this one deal a day model is the

      focus.  It puts the merchant in the spotlight and makes it feel really

      special, and it makes a really simple yes-no decision for consumers.

      I mean, I think it’s one of the things that differentiates us from the

      coupon and deal sites that came before where there was just this list of

      deals, and it’s overwhelming and everything feels cheap.  But we can really

      make these really special businesses feel special by making them the

      exclusive subject of our site for a day.

    • And he said, “I don’t know,

      but it’s two people somewhere in a garage working on something I’ve never

      heard of.” That’s what he feared.

    • You really — you had that thought, let’s create

      something that can change the world, rather than what might work and what

      might do some — here is a good idea.  If we can somehow tap into showing a

      whole new set of people that small businesses can give them an experience

      and a bargain, that’s not changing the world, that’s sort of saying –

      that’s a business?

    • And then the pivot to Groupon wasn’t expected by anyone, including us.

      I mean, I think we started it as a side project, and it was like, here’s

      this is cool.  We didn’t think we were going to start this billion dollar

      business.

    • : Here is a cool thing we could do for a group of people

      who are part of a social network.  And rather than raising money we’ll show

      them bargains.

    • So when we got our — when we saw that, it allowed us to really dig

      in.  And I think that continues to be what drives us, is that we’re here to

      help.  We’re — I mean, remember, our DNA are people who started this

      thing, who started a company because we wanted to — because we wanted to

      change the world and make it better.

    • ANDREW MASON: That’s the social graph that exists through tools like

      Facebook and Twitter, and it just allows companies to grow at a rate that

      is unprecedented.

      And I think when people call us the fastest growing company ever, I

      think of us as like the N-Sync of websites, like we have had good tunes,

      but we’re not The Beatles.  It’s not like we’re the best thing ever.  But

      our success and the amount of money we’ve made is largely because of the

      environment that we’re growing companies in.

      So I think that we’ll continue to see more companies like us who make

      us — who put us to shame a couple years from now with their rate of

      growth.

    • ANDREW MASON: It’s a great way to — well, first of all, Groupon is

      an inherently social service because the content is social.  It’s

      restaurants.  It’s theater.  It’s stuff that you do with friends.

    • ANDREW MASON: Yes, it’s not for you.  But hopefully that won’t

      happen.  One of the great things about Groupon is that every day we’re

      featuring businesses that have never — not only have they never run a

      discount before, they’ve never advertised before, like world renowned art

      museums, James Beard award-winning restaurants.  We found a way to make the

      coupon cool.

  • tags: mobile development

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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