My daily readings 08/04/2010

    • Q: Can I configure the reverse DNS record for my Elastic IP address?

      Yes, you can configure the reverse DNS record of your Elastic IP address by filling out this form. Note that a corresponding forward DNS record pointing to that Elastic IP address must exist before we can create the reverse DNS record.

    • Q: What happens to my data when a system terminates?

      The data stored on a local instance store will persist only as long as that instance is alive. However, data that is stored on an Amazon EBS volume will persist independently of the life of the instance.

      Therefore, we recommend that you should use the local instance store for temporary data and if you want to increase your data durability we recommend using Amazon EBS volumes or backing up the data to Amazon S3.

  • tags: EC2 EBS

    • Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) provides block level storage volumes for use with Amazon EC2 instances. Amazon EBS volumes are off-instance storage that persists independently from the life of an instance. Amazon Elastic Block Store provides highly available, highly reliable storage volumes that can be attached to a running Amazon EC2 instance and exposed as a device within the instance. Amazon EBS is particularly suited for applications that require a database, file system, or access to raw block level storage.
    • Amazon EBS volumes are placed in a specific Availability Zone, and can then be attached to instances also in that same Availability Zone.
    • Each storage volume is automatically replicated within the same Availability Zone. This prevents data loss due to failure of any single hardware component.
    • Amazon EBS also provides the ability to create point-in-time snapshots of volumes, which are persisted to Amazon S3. These snapshots can be used as the starting point for new Amazon EBS volumes, and protect data for long-term durability. The same snapshot can be used to instantiate as many volumes as you wish.
    • Amazon EBS volumes are created in a particular Availability Zone and can be from 1 GB to 1 TB in size. Once a volume is created, it can be attached to any Amazon EC2 instance in the same Availability Zone. Once attached, it will appear as a mounted device similar to any hard drive or other block device. At that point, the instance can interact with the volume just as it would with a local drive, formatting it with a file system or installing applications on it directly.
    • A volume can only be attached to one instance at a time, but many volumes can be attached to a single instance. This means that you can attach multiple volumes and stripe your data across them for increased I/O and throughput performance. This is particularly helpful for database style applications that frequently encounter many random reads and writes across the dataset. If an instance fails or is detached from an Amazon EBS volume, the volume can be attached to any other instance in that Availability Zone.
    • Select a pre-configured, templated image to get up and running immediately. Or create an Amazon Machine Image (AMI) containing your applications, libraries, data, and associated configuration settings.
    • Reserved Instances – Reserved Instances give you the option to make a low, one-time payment for each instance you want to reserve and in turn receive a significant discount on the hourly usage charge for that instance. After the one-time payment for an instance, that instance is reserved for you, and you have no further obligation; you may choose to run that instance for the discounted usage rate for the duration of your term, or when you do not use the instance, you will not pay usage charges on it.
    • Amazon Elastic Block Store – Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) offers persistent storage for Amazon EC2 instances. Amazon EBS volumes provide off-instance storage that persists independently from the life of an instance. Amazon EBS volumes are highly available, highly reliable volumes that can be leveraged as an Amazon EC2 instance’s boot partition or attached to a running Amazon EC2 instance as a standard block device. When used as a boot partition, Amazon EC2 instances can be stopped and subsequently restarted, enabling you to only pay for the storage resources used while maintaining your instance’s state. Amazon EBS volumes offer greatly improved durability over local Amazon EC2 instance stores, as Amazon EBS volumes are automatically replicated on the backend (in a single Availability Zone). For those wanting even more durability, Amazon EBS provides the ability to create point-in-time consistent snapshots of your volumes that are then stored in Amazon S3, and automatically replicated across multiple Availability Zones. These snapshots can be used as the starting point for new Amazon EBS volumes, and can protect your data for long term durability. You can also easily share these snapshots with co-workers and other AWS developers. See Amazon Elastic Block Store for more details on this feature.
    • What happens to my data when my instance terminates?

      Once the instance is terminated (on your command, or due to a hardware or system software failure), your data is gone.

      Most people use Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) or Amazon S3 for storage of data produced and consumed by their Amazon EC2 applications.

      Feature Guide: Elastic Block Store: http://developer.amazonwebservices.com/connect/entry.jspa?externalID=1667&categoryID=100

      You should also take a look at Amazon SimpleDB to see if it fits the needs of your application.

      Note: your data will be preserved if you explicitly reboot an instance.

  • tags: Gmail idea

  • tags: article

  • tags: Startup focus

  • tags: Startup lanuch

  • tags: javascript

  • tags: Education

  • tags: Education

  • tags: Startup

  • tags: Books

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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