My daily readings 07/23/2010

  • tags: Tornado

  • tags: Product management development

      • Over the next few months, we are going to be rolling out a new release process to accelerate the pace at which Google Chrome stable releases become available. Running under ideal conditions, we will be looking to release a new stable version about once every six weeks, roughly twice as often as we do today.
        So why the change? We have three fundamental goals in reducing the cycle time:
        • Shorten the release cycle and still get great features in front of users when they are ready
        • Make the schedule more predictable and easier to scope
        • Reduce the pressure on engineering to “make” a release
      • So why the change? We have three fundamental goals in reducing the cycle time:
        • Shorten the release cycle and still get great features in front of users when they are ready
        • Make the schedule more predictable and easier to scope
        • Reduce the pressure on engineering to “make” a release
        The first goal is fairly straightforward, given our pace of development. We have new features coming out all the time and do not want users to have to wait months before they can use them. While pace is important to us, we are all committed to maintaining high quality releases — if a feature is not ready, it will not ship in a stable release.
    • The second goal is about implementing good project management practice. Predictable fixed duration development periods allow us to determine how much work we can do in a fixed amount of time, and makes schedule communication simple. We basically wanted to operate more like trains leaving Grand Central Station (regularly scheduled and always on time), and less like taxis leaving the Bronx (ad hoc and unpredictable).
    • With the new schedule, if a given feature is not complete, it will simply ride on the the next release train when it’s ready. Since those trains come quickly and regularly (every six weeks), there is less stress.
  • tags: Flipboard

  • tags: Startup

  • How do people in startups view design?

    tags: design

  • tags: design

  • tags: design

  • tags: collaboration

  • tags: Video

    • I think most people have one top idea in their mind at any given
      time. That’s the idea their thoughts will drift toward when they’re
      allowed to drift freely. And this idea will thus tend to get all
      the benefit of that type of thinking, while others are starved of
      it. Which means it’s a disaster to let the wrong idea become the
      top one in your mind.
    • I’d noticed startups got way less done when they started raising
      money, but it was not till we ourselves raised money that I understood
      why. The problem is not the actual time it takes to meet with
      investors. The problem is that once you start raising money, raising
      money becomes the top idea in your mind. That becomes what you
      think about when you take a shower in the morning. And that means
      other questions aren’t.
    • It’s not going to happen unless you let it become the
      thing you think about in the shower.
    • Try to get yourself into situations where
      the most urgent problems are ones you want think about.
    • One I’ve already mentioned: thoughts
      about money. Getting money is almost by definition an attention
      sink.
      The other is disputes. These too are engaging in the
      wrong way: they have the same velcro-like shape as genuinely
      interesting ideas, but without the substance. So avoid
      disputes

      disputes
      if you want to get real work done.

    • I suspect a lot of people aren’t sure what’s the top idea in their
      mind at any given time. I’m often mistaken about it. I tend to
      think it’s the idea I’d want to be the top one, rather than the one
      that is. But it’s easy to figure this out: just take a shower.
      What topic do your thoughts keep returning to? If it’s not what
      you want to be thinking about, you may want to change something.
  • tags: NoSQL

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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