My daily readings 07/27/2009

  • tags: Education

    • When we talk about learning, we really mean two quite different things, the process of discovery and of mastering what one discovers. All children are naturally driven to create an accurate picture of the world and, with the help of adults to use that picture to make predictions, formulate explanations, imagine alternatives and design plans. Call it “guided discovery.”
    • As in the gear-and-switch experiments, children seem to learn best when they can explore the world and interact with expert adults.
    • In guided discovery – figuring out how the world works or unraveling the structure of making tortillas – children learn to solve new problems. But what is expected in school, at least in part, involves a very different process: call it “routinized learning.” Something already learned is made to be second nature, so as to perform a skill effortlessly and quickly.
    • Children would never tolerate baseball if all they did was practice. No coach would evaluate a child, and no society would evaluate a coach, based on performance in the batting cage. What makes for learning is the right balance of both learning processes, allowing children to retain their native brilliance as they grow up.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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